Tag Archives for " ecological balance "

176 – Forest Shomer Native Plants

Published 6 years ago in Permaculture , Podcasts , wild foods - 0 Comments

Paul Wheaton talks to Forest Shomer, who was in his video on self-seeding tomatoes grown without irrigation. They had just been to a camas prairie. Forest shares about how life used to be like in the area (they are in Port Townshend), and how harvesting was similar to permaculture. They talk about the natural history […]

137 – Eco Farm

Published 7 years ago in food , Permaculture , Podcasts - 0 Comments

Paul Wheaton and Helen Atthowe talk about Eco-Farm, a conference that goes beyond organic farming into integral land stewardship, and social justice. Helen spoke about veganic permaculture, particularly because people have been wary as of late of using animal manures due to E. coli scares. Helen teaches about green manures. Helen shares about a cover-cropping […]

136 – Gaia’s Garden Chapter 9

Published 7 years ago in Permaculture , Podcasts - 0 Comments

Paul Wheaton and Jocelyn Campbell review chapter 9 of Gaia’s Garden, by Toby Hemenway. Paul first suggests doing an RV road trip. Chapter 9 talks about guilds and super guilds, and how do you pick the plants for your area. Observation, looking things up, and assembling a guild based on function. A guild is a […]

105 – Sepp Holzer Permaculture Chapter 1 Part 5

Published 7 years ago in Permaculture , Podcasts , Sepp Holzer - 0 Comments

Paul Wheaton and Kelda Miller continue reviewing chapter 1 of Sepp Holzer’s Permaculture. Kelda starts by describing her blind taste test of a watered vs. unwatered tomato (unwatered wins). Paul shares about the Sepp Holzer event this spring, and the PDC before it. Sepp will definitely be talking about ponds, aquaculture, and micro-hydro. Sepp’s book […]

075 – Review of Gaia’s Garden, Chapter 7

Published 7 years ago in chickens , Permaculture , Podcasts - 0 Comments

Paul Wheaton and Jocelyn Campbell review Gaia’s Garden Chapter 7, by Toby Hemenway: Bringing in the bees, birds, and other helpful animals. Polyculture attracts a diverse home ecosystem, which makes things more resilient and healthy. Paul shares his llama poop story. Jocelyn brings up the importance of having producers, consumers, and decomposers all present to […]

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